Career opportunities at ESA: Student internships at the Control Centre in Darmstadt

Career opportunities at ESA: Student internships at the Control Centre in Darmstadt

Spacecraft operations engineer Carmen Ricote Navarro during the launch of Sentinel-2B

5 September 2017

Are you studying engineering, IT, physics or mathematics? Are you fascinated by space? Have you always wanted to know how a satellite can navigate the distant corners of space? If yes, you should find out about the career opportunities available in Darmstadt at the moment!

Lift-off for your career

You can gain first-hand experience with a 3-6 month internship, while gaining great insights into the work at ESOC. You will be working as a member of one of the many interdisciplinary teams with a broad range of backgrounds and nationalities.

The areas in which interns can work are manifold. Just take a look at our application form and select the area of work that interests you most and convince us with your application. Maybe you even want to take the chance and combine your internship at ESA with your master’s thesis?

You should meet the following requirements:

  • You are national of an ESA member state
  • You are currently earning your Masters’ degree
  • Communication in English comes naturally to you
  • You enjoy working in an international environment
  • You want to contribute to an international team

Interested? The deadline for submitting your application is 31 October 2017. More information and the link to the application form can be found on our website.

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Hello, Darmstadt?

Description

The European Space Operations Centre, ESOC, in Darmstadt, Germany, has served as Europe’s gateway to space for half a century. In 2017, the centre is celebrating its 50th anniversary, highlighting a rich history of achievement in space.

This video offers a high-speed visual tour through five decades of mission control, which encompasses 77 spacecraft, ranging from telecom, weather, Earth observation and climate monitoring satellites to spacecraft studying the Sun and peering deep into our Universe.

Exploring our Solar System, teams at ESOC have flown missions to the Moon, Mars and Venus, as well as three epoch-making triumphs: Giotto’s flyby of Halley’s Comet in 1986, the Huygens landing on Saturn’s moon Titan in 2005 and Rosetta’s delivery of Philae to comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko in 2014 – humanity’s first landing on a comet.

#ESOC50
http://www.esa.int/esoc50

Last Galileo leaves ESA’s Test Centre

Last Galileo leaves ESA’s Test Centre

Last Galileo departs

4 September 2017

The last of 22 Galileo satellites has departed ESA’s Test Centre in the Netherlands – concluding the single longest and largest scale test campaign in the establishment’s history.

Cocooned in a protective container for its journey – equipped with air conditioning, temperature control and shock absorbers – the final Galileo satellite left the establishment by lorry on 24 August.

ESA’s Test Centre at ESTEC in Noordwijk, the Netherlands houses a collection of test equipment to simulate all aspects of spaceflight. It is operated for ESA by private company European Test Services (ETS) B.V.

In May 2013, the Test Centre began testing the first of 22 Galileo ‘Full Operational Capability’ (FOC) satellites, having previously performed the same function for the very first Galileo ‘In-Orbit Validation’ satellite under a separate contract.

Galileo vacuum test

The Galileo FOC satellites had their platforms built by OHB System AG in Germany, incorporating navigation payloads coming from Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd in the UK. They then travelled on to ESTEC, to be subjected to the equivalent vibration, acoustic noise, vacuum and temperature extremes that they will experience for real during their launch and orbit, plus testing of their radio systems.

With a steady stream of satellites coming off the production line, the challenge for the combined ETS and OHB team overseeing Galileo testing was to put them through all necessary tests on a rapid and efficient basis, while also keeping the Test Centre accessible to other European missions requiring its unique services.

A total of 14 FOC satellites have since joined the first four IOV satellites in orbit, forming an 18-strong constellation that began Initial Services to global users on 15 December last year. The next four FOC satellites are scheduled for launch on an Ariane 5 this December.

Galileo satellites

“For the first time in more than four years there are no Galileo satellites in the Test Centre, but hopefully this will not be the end of our association with the programme,” comments Jörg Selle, ETS Managing Director.

“The contract for making the next eight Galileo satellites – known as Batch 3 – was also awarded to OHB last June, and ETS will be bidding for the contract to test these satellites too.”

“The availability of the ETS facilities in ESTEC have substantially contributed to the programme,” said Paul Verhoef, ESA Director of the Galileo Programme and Navigation-related Activities. “We thank ETS for their professionalism and support over this extended period.”

The final Galileo travelled back to OHB in Germany for some final refurbishment ahead of its launch together with another three satellites in December. 

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