Officials Release Details of Latest Counter-ISIS Strikes in Syria, Iraq

SOUTHWEST ASIA, Aug. 18, 2017 — U.S. and coalition military forces continued to attack the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria yesterday, conducting 27 strikes consisting of 40 engagements, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of yesterday’s strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Strikes in Syria

In Syria, coalition military forces conducted 22 strikes consisting of 24 engagements against ISIS targets:

— Near Abu Kamal, three strikes destroyed three ISIS oil stills, two pieces of oil equipment and a weapons cache.

— Near Dayr Az Zawr, a strike destroyed an ISIS headquarters and an ISIS media center.

— Near Raqqa, 18 strikes engaged 12 ISIS tactical units and destroyed 29 fighting positions, three ISIS communication lines and two logistics nodes.

Strikes in Iraq

In Iraq, coalition military forces conducted five strikes consisting of 16 engagements against ISIS targets:

— Near Beiji, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed two vehicles, a supply cache and a staging area.

— Near Tal Afar, four strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit; destroyed a front-end loader, an ISIS-held building and a mortar system; and suppressed a mortar team.

Previous Strikes

Additionally, 33 strikes consisting of 47 engagements were conducted in Syria and Iraq on Aug. 15-16 that closed within the last 24 hours.

— On Aug. 15, near Raqqa, Syria, four strikes engaged three ISIS tactical units and destroyed four fighting positions and a mortar system.

— On Aug. 16, near Abu Kamal, Syria, a strike destroyed an ISIS media center.

— On Aug. 16, near Shadaddi, Syria, two strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed a command-and-control node, a fighting position and an ISIS communication line.

— On Aug. 16, near Raqqa, Syria, 23 strikes engaged 16 ISIS tactical units and destroyed 18 fighting positions, eight command-and-control nodes, two tunnels, two heavy machine guns, an ISIS unmanned aerial system, an anti-aircraft artillery system and an ISIS line of communication.

— On Aug. 16, near Tal Afar, Iraq, three strikes destroyed 32 improvised explosive devices, 17 ISIS fighting positions, two tunnels and an artillery system and damaged three bridges.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said. 

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and some ground-based tactical artillery when fired on planned targets, officials noted.

Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike, they added. A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

Face of Defense: Army Reserve Sniper is Mentor, Model Soldier

JOINT BASE MCGUIRE-DIX-LAKEHURST, N.J., Aug. 18, 2017 — Army Sgt. Ian Rivera-Aponte lies motionless in the tall grass, hidden by face paint and his ghillie suit. He stares down the scope of his M2010 Enhanced Sniper Rifle and waits to take the shot. This is the life of a sniper.

Rivera-Aponte is a third-generation service member. His father served and his grandfather fought in Vietnam. Seventy-nine percent of soldiers come from families that have served in the military.

“I’m just trying to carry on that family legacy,” he said.

Originally from Trujillo Alto, Puerto Rico, he’s part of the only infantry unit in the Army Reserve, the 100th Infantry Battalion, based at Fort Shafter, Hawaii.

He’s tremendously skilled at his craft. His personal best shot was a target 2,450 meters away.

Rivera-Aponte was one of six soldiers who were recently flown here for a photoshoot with Army Reserve Communications, the Army Marketing and Research Group and the U.S. Army Recruiting Command. He’ll be featured on upcoming commercials and posters.

Mentoring

During his three days on post, he spoke frequently of his proudest moment out of his six years of service.

“I had a guy and was his team lead and I was able to train him up on how to do everything a sniper would do, and he got to go to sniper school and he was a first-time go. It was a huge accomplishment because he was my pupil and I got to mold him. I was extremely happy,” Rivera-Aponte said.

He was asked about how realistic recent popular movies are compared to what he goes through with his unit.

“I laugh at some of the movies and the way they portray snipers, but they are entertaining,” Rivera-Aponte said. “Things that would take days to prepare they do it in five minutes.”

Jokes aside, he is gearing up toward a unique opportunity this October.

“The International Sniper Competition happens in October. Every branch of the military will send a team. Myself and another team leader are going. Just the fact that we got invited is an achievement. We’ll be the first Army Reserve soldiers to ever attend,” Rivera-Aponte said.

The competition takes place Oct. 15-21 at Fort Benning, Georgia. The goal is to identify the best sniper team from a wide range of agencies and organizations, including U.S. and foreign service members and local, state and federal law enforcement personnel.

Chinese Film Panorama 2017 to showcase recent highlights of Chinese cinema (with photos)

     Chinese Film Panorama 2017, to be held from September 18 to October 22, will showcase 16 recent Chinese movies at venues including the Grand Theatre of the Hong Kong Cultural Centre, the Cinema of the Hong Kong Film Archive and the Lecture Halls of the Hong Kong Space Museum and the Hong Kong Science Museum. Jointly presented by the Leisure and Cultural Services Department and the South China Film Industry Workers Union, the Chinese Film Panorama has been witnessing the thriving development and achievements of Chinese cinema since its first edition in 1997.

     The opening film “Born in China” (2016) is an animal story directed by Lu Chuan, and made in association with Disneynature and narrated by noted actress Zhou Xun. Incredible animals like the snow leopard, the golden monkey, the giant panda and the chiru move across places in China according to the season in order to survive in the spectacular yet brutal nature. The film won Best Documentary at the 3rd Silk Road International Film Festival.

     In “The Blood Hound” (2017), Zhu, a forest ranger, takes in a stray dog named Rambo and trains it for work. Rambo also becomes the companion of Zhu’s daughters and seems to have human attributes, going as far as saving the Zhu family from a poacher’s evil scheme. The film won Best Feature Film at the 3rd Silk Road International Film Festival. “Knife in the Clear Water” (2016) features a farmer preparing to sacrifice his old loyal cow for his deceased wife and the days in which the farmer and the cow live together before the ceremony. Based on a novel by Shi Shuqing, the film uses a simple plot and slow movements to suggest solemnity and unwillingness in life. The film won the New Currents Award at the Busan International Film Festival 2016 as well as the NETPAC Award and the Special Mention (Cinematography) at the Hawaii International Film Festival 2016.

     “The Master” (2015), scripted and directed by acclaimed martial arts novel writer Xu Haofeng, depicts the increasing influence of warlords in martial arts societies, triggering disunion in the martial world. Xu also served as the action choreographer of the film, creating breathtaking moves and fight sequences. The film won Best Action Choreography at the 52nd Golden Horse Awards and Best Supporting Actor at the Beijing International Film Festival 2016. Starring Wallace Huo and Qin Hailu, the suspense thriller “Hide and Seek” (2016) is adapted from a Korean film of the same title. The film tells of a series of shocking twists and scary moments stemming from the disappearance of Huo’s brother. 

     An adaptation of the Italian film “Stanno Tutti Bene” (1990), “Everybody’s Fine” (2016) follows a retired geologist (Zhang Guoli) who lives alone in Beijing and decides to travel to Tianjin, Hangzhou, Shanghai and Macau to visit his children. He then discovers that his children have their own difficulties and are not enjoying the perfect lives that they reported on the phone. “The Song of Cotton” (2016), based on a novel by Ha Jin, focuses on an elderly man with dementia, Mr Sheng (Wang Deshun), as well as his daughter (Ai Liya) and a care attendant (Yan Bingyan), and through their story explores the social issues arising from an ageing population. The film won Best Film, Best Actress in a Leading Role, Best Actress in a Supporting Role and Best New Director at the China Movie Channel Media Awards of the 19th Shanghai International Film Festival.

     In “Kaili Blues” (2016), doctor Chen Sheng travels to a rural town to find his brother’s abandoned son to fulfil a request of his late mother. The plot weaves in trivial daily matters while the otherworldly scenes and music help present a dreamy odyssey to audiences. The film won Best New Director and the FIPRESCI Prize at the 52nd Golden Horse Awards as well as Best Emerging Director and Best First Feature – Special Mention at the 68th Locarno International Film Festival. “Paths of the Soul” (2017) follows the journey of a Tibetan holy pilgrimage to Lhasa and Mount Kailash. The group of 11, including one person fulfilling his father’s last wish, face many hardships along the way until they can reach their destination. The film won the Special Jury Award at the China Film Directors’ Guild Awards 2015.

     Adapted from a novel by Lu Nei, “Young Love Lost” (2017) depicts laughter and tears along the journey of growing up. The original novel is popular among youngsters and the film highlights the rebellion, inspiration and romance of the coming-of-age story in a vibrant way. The film won Best Directorial Debut at the Beijing College Student Film Festival 2016. In “The Summer is Gone” (2017), a boy who is going to secondary school after summer experiences an unusual vacation as his parents are anxious about their livelihood. The film was the debut work for the director and all the actors, and it won Best Feature Film, Best New Performer and the FIPRESCI Prize at the 53rd Golden Horse Awards.

     The magical romance “Crosscurrent” (2016) features a young captain (Qin Hao) who makes a courier trip from Shanghai up the Yangtze River following the route on a map left by his father. In the journey, he keeps meeting a mysterious woman (Xin Zhilei) along the river. The images and score complement well to showcase the magnificent Yangtze River in the fullest. The film won Best Sound at the Asian Film Awards 2017 and the Silver Bear for Outstanding Artistic Contribution at the Berlin International Film Festival 2016 as well as Best Cinematography and Best Sound Effects at the 53rd Golden Horse Awards. “When Larry Met Mary” (2016) is a romantic comedy about two lifelong friends, Larry and Mary. Mary has many men chasing her while Larry likes her but is always too scared to go a step further in the relationship. The film won the 2nd Prize of the Special Chinese Film Festival in the 40th Montreal World Film Festival.  

     “Distance” (2016) consists of three short melodramas directed by filmmakers from the Mainland, Singapore and Thailand and all starring Chen Bolin. The stories feature the weakening relationships of family, friends and lovers due to geographic and psychological distances.
 
     In addition, “The Warriors” (2016) and “The Spirits of the Drum” (2016) will be screened at the Rayson Huang Theatre of the University of Hong Kong, Cine-Art House, the Auditorium of North District Town Hall and the Sunbeam Theatre with free admission. “The Warriors” is themed on the Battle of Luding Bridge of the Red Army while “The Spirits of the Drum” tells of a search for revenge that culminates in a drumming competition.

     “Kaili Blues” is in the Guizhou dialect and Putonghua, “Paths of the Soul” is in Tibetan, “Crosscurrent” is in Tibetan and Putonghua and the other films are in Putonghua. All films have Chinese and English subtitles.
 
     Tickets priced at $55 are now available at URBTIX (www.urbtix.hk). For credit card telephone bookings, please call 2111 5999. Tickets for free screenings will be distributed at the respective venues of the free screenings from September 1 onwards. Each person can receive up to two tickets per screening on a first-come, first-served basis while stocks last. For programme details, please call 2734 2900 or visit www.lcsd.gov.hk/fp/en_US/web/fpo/programmes/2017cfp/index.html.

Mānoa: Foreign policy in Asia to be topic of lecture by former leader of U.S. Pacific Command

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

Contact:

Posted: Aug 17, 2017
Admiral Thomas B. Fargo, USN (Ret.)
Admiral Thomas B. Fargo, USN (Ret.)

The UH Shidler College of Business will feature Admiral Thomas B. Fargo, USN (Ret.), at its annual Dr. N.H. Paul Chung Memorial Lecture and Luncheon on Wednesday, September 6, 2017, at the Hawaiʻi Prince Hotel. Fargo will deliver a talk, “Foreign policy in the new Asia and its implications on Hawai‘i business: Is diplomacy possible under the present leadership—Trump, Xi, Kim, Abe…?” 

Fargo completed his illustrious military career as the commander of the U.S. Pacific Command after 35 years of service. As the U.S. military commander in East Asia, the Pacific and Indian Ocean areas, he led the largest unified command while directing the joint operations of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force. He also served as the commander in chief of the U.S. Pacific Fleet from 1999 to 2002 and served five commands in the Pacific, Indian Ocean and Middle East, as well as six tours in Washington, D.C.

In 2005, Fargo entered the private sector as chairman of Huntington Ingalls Industries, America’s largest military shipbuilder. He also serves on the board of directors for Hawaiian Electric Industries, Matson, The Greenbrier Companies, U.S. Automobile Association and other smaller private and venture capital companies.

Fargo is active in the community, serving as a board member for the Japan American Society of Hawaiʻi, Friends of Hawaiʻi Charities, ‘Iolani School and the Hawaiʻi State Junior Golf Association.

When:            Wednesday, September 6, 2017
                       Registration – 11:15 a.m.
                       Lunch and Lecture – 11:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Where:           Hawaiʻi Prince Hotel

Cost:              General Public – $35, UH Faculty/Staff/Students – $25

Sponsor:       The Pacific Asian Management Institute at the UH Mānoa Shidler College of Business

RSVP:            To register, visit pami.shidler.hawaii.edu/paul-chung, email pami@hawaii.edu or
                       call (808) 956-8041.

For more information, visit: http://shidler.hawaii.edu/

Press Releases: Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to Deliver Address to State Department Student Programs and Fellowships Participants

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson delivers remarks to the current cohorts of the Unpaid Student Internship Program, the Unpaid Legal Intern program, The Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program and Summer Enrichment Scholars, the Thomas R. Pickering Fellows, and the Franklin Fellows at 10:10 a.m. on Friday, August 18, 2017, at the U.S. Department of State.

All of these programs serve to expose the participants to the work of the U.S. Department of State and provide them the opportunity to contribute to the mission of the Department and to experience what a career in the Foreign and Civil Services entails.

The Secretary’s remarks will be open press coverage. There will be a pooled camera spray of the group photo with the students preceding the Secretary’s remarks.

Please watch the remarks streamed live on www.state.gov and Facebook.com/usdos. Please follow @StateDept for more information.

Preset time for video cameras: 9:30 a.m. from the 23rd Street Entrance Lobby.

Final access time for journalists and still photographers: 9:45 a.m. from the 23rd Street Entrance Lobby.

Media representatives may attend this event upon presentation of one of the following: (1) A U.S. Government-issued identification card (Department of State, White House, Congress, Department of Defense or Foreign Press Center), (2) a media-issued photo identification card, or (3) a letter from their employer on letterhead verifying their employment as a journalist, accompanied by an official photo identification card (driver’s license, passport).

For further information, please contact the Press Office at 202-647-2492.

The Rhythms of Sign Language


Discovery

The Rhythms of Sign Language

Brain activity in the visual cortex aligns to rhythms of hands in sign language, new research shows

July 14, 2017

From an outside perspective, understanding a spoken language versus a signed language seems like it might involve entirely different brain processes. One process involves your ears and the other your eyes, and scientists have long known that different parts of the brain process these different sensory inputs.

To scientists at the University of Chicago interested in the role rhythm plays in how humans understand language, the differences between these inputs provided an opportunity for experimentation. The resulting study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences helps explain that rhythm is important for processing language whether spoken or signed.

Previous studies have shown the rhythm of speech changes the rhythm of neural activity involved in understanding spoken language. When humans listen to spoken language, the brain’s auditory cortex activity adjusts to follow the rhythms of sentences. This phenomenon is known as entrainment.

But even after researchers identified entrainment, understanding the role of rhythm in language comprehension remained difficult. Neural activity changes when a person is listening to spoken language — but the brain also locks onto random, meaningless bursts of sound in a very similar way and at a similar frequency.

That’s where the University of Chicago team saw an experimental opportunity involving sign language. While the natural rhythms in spoken language are similar to what might be considered the preferred frequency for the auditory cortex, this is not true for sign language and the visual cortex. The rhythms from the hand movements in ASL are substantially slower than that of spoken language.

The researchers used electroencephalography (EEG) to record the brain activity of participants as they watched videos of stories told in American Sign Language (ASL). One group was made up of participants who were fluent in ASL, while the other was made up of non-signers. The researchers then analyzed the rhythms of activity in different regions of the participants’ brains.

The brain activity rhythms in the visual cortex followed the rhythms of sign language. Importantly, the researchers observed entrainment at the low frequencies that carry meaningful information in sign language, not at the high frequencies usually seen in visual activity.

“By looking at sign, we’ve learned something about how the brain processes language more generally,” said principal investigator Daniel Casasanto, Professor of Psychology at the University of Chicago. “We’ve solved a mystery we couldn’t crack by studying speech alone.”

While the ASL-fluent and non-signer groups demonstrated entrainment, it was stronger in the frontal cortex for ASL-fluent participants, compared to non-signers. The frontal cortex is the area of the brain that controls cognitive skills. The authors postulate that frontal entrainment may be stronger in the fluent signers because they are more able to predict the movements involved and therefore more able to predict and entrain to the rhythms they see.

“This study highlights the importance of rhythm to processing language, even when it is visual. Studies like this are core to the National Science Foundation’s Understanding the Brain Initiative, which seeks to understand the brain in action and in context,” said Betty Tuller, a program manager for NSF’s Perception, Action, and Cognition Program. “Knowledge of the fundamentals of how the brain processes language has the potential to improve how we educate children, treat language disorders, train military personnel, and may have implications for the study of learning and memory.”

Investigators
Steven Small
Brooke Noonan
Howard Nusbaum
Meghan Hammond
Daniel Casasanto

Related Institutions/Organizations
University of Chicago

Related Awards
#1144082 Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP)
#1257101 How motor action shapes emotion in the brain
#0116293 MRI: Acquisition of Instrumentation to Measure the Time-Course and Distribution of Cortical Activity in Perceptual Cognitive, and Social Psychological Processing

Total Grants
$18,146,138

Secretary Cascos reminds voters of Feb. 1 Registration Deadline

voters must register by February 1 for March 1 Primary Election

January 26, 2016
Contact: Alicia Pierce or Mari Bergman
512-463-5770

AUSTIN, TX – Today, Texas Secretary of State Carlos Cascos reminded Texans that February 1 is the deadline to register in time for the March 1 Primary Election.

“I encourage all qualified Texans who aren’t already registered or who need to update their registrations to do so before the February 1 deadline,” said Secretary Cascos. “This primary election will help decide which candidates will be on the ballot in November.”

Texans can register to vote in several ways including downloading a mail-in application at VoteTexas.gov. Applications must be postmarked February 1 or earlier to meet the deadline. Eligible voters may also apply in person at their county voter registrar’s office.

Texans can check their registration status through VoteTexas.gov and even make updates online if they are not changing their county of registration. The 30-day deadline also applies to registration updates such as changing your address.

Texans do not select a party when registering. Qualified voters are free to vote in either the Republican or Democratic Primary, but not both. This includes the primary runoff election.
 
Early voting begins February 16 and continues through February 26. The deadline to request a ballot by mail is February 19.

Photo ID is currently required for voting in person. The seven forms of approved photo ID are:

  • Texas driver license issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS)
  • Texas Election Identification Certificate issued by DPS
  • Texas personal identification card issued by DPS
  • Texas handgun license issued by DPS
  • United States military identification card containing the person’s photograph
  • United States citizenship certificate containing the person’s photograph
  • United States passport

With the exception of the U.S. citizenship certificate, the identification must be current or have expired no more than 60 days before being presented at the polling place.

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Secretary Cascos reminds Texans Early Voting Starts Feb. 16

February 12, 2016
Contact: Alicia Pierce or Mari Bergman
512-463-5770

AUSTIN, TX – Today, Texas Secretary of State Carlos H. Cascos reminded Texans that early voting for the March 1 Primary Election begins on Tuesday, February 16, and runs through Friday, February 26.

“I encourage voters to take full advantage of the convenience of voting early,” said Secretary Cascos. “Don’t forget, during early voting you can cast your ballot at any polling location within your county of registration.”

The primary election will determine which candidates will appear on the ballot as the nominees from the Republican and Democrat parties in the November general election. Texas voters may vote in either the Republican or Democratic primaries, but not both.

The last day to register to vote in time for the March 1 Primary was February 1, but qualified Texans who missed the deadline can still register by April 25 for the primary runoff election on May 24.

Secretary Cascos also reminded voters they will need to bring photo ID if they cast a ballot in person.

“The photo ID requirement is still in effect,” said Cascos. “Voters will need to present one of seven forms of approved photo ID when coming to the polls.”

The forms of approved photo ID are:

  1. Texas Driver License – issued by the Department of Public Safety (DPS)
  2. Texas Personal Identification Card – issued by DPS
  3. Texas Concealed Handgun License – issued by DPS
  4. United States Military Identification card containing the person’s photograph
  5. United States Citizenship Certificate containing the person’s photograph
  6. United States Passport – issued by the U.S. government
  7. Election Identification Certificate – issued free by DPS

Any citizen who does not have an approved ID can apply for a free Election Identification Certificate and should visit VoteTexas.gov or call 1-800-252-VOTE for more information.

Voters can contact their county elections office to locate the most convenient polling place, or they can follow the links at www.votetexas.gov. During Early Voting, polling place times will vary from county to county.

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Secretary Cascos reminds Texans early voting for runoff starts May 16

May 14, 2016
Contact: Alicia Pierce or Mari Bergman
512-463-5770

AUSTIN, TX – Today, Texas Secretary of State Carlos H. Cascos reminded Texans that early voting for the May 24 Primary Runoff Election begins on Monday, May 16, and runs through Friday, May 20.

“The primary runoff is an opportunity for voters to decide who will represent their party in races where no candidate secured a majority of the votes,” said Secretary Cascos. “It’s a time to finalize which Republican and Democrat candidates will be on the ballot in November.”

If voters participated in the primary election for either the Republican or Democrat party, they will be limited to voting in the same party for the runoff. Voters who did not vote in the primary or participate in any third party nominating conventions may still vote in the runoff and may select either party runoff election in which to vote.

Secretary Cascos also reminded voters they will need to bring photo ID if they cast a ballot in person.

“The photo ID requirement is still in effect,” said Cascos. “Voters will need to present one of seven forms of approved photo ID when coming to the polls.”

The forms of approved photo ID are:

  1. Texas Driver License – issued by the Department of Public Safety (DPS)
  2. Texas Personal Identification Card – issued by DPS
  3. Texas Concealed Handgun License – issued by DPS
  4. United States Military Identification card containing the person’s photograph
  5. United States Citizenship Certificate containing the person’s photograph
  6. United States Passport – issued by the U.S. government
  7. Election Identification Certificate – issued free by DPS

Any citizen who does not have an approved ID can apply for a free Election Identification Certificate and should visit VoteTexas.gov or call 1-800-252-VOTE for more information.

Voters can contact their county elections office to locate the most convenient polling place, or they can follow the links at www.votetexas.gov. During early voting, polling place times will vary from county to county and voters may vote at any polling location in their county.

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Voters in HD120 special runoff election have additional ID options

July 24, 2016
Contact: Alicia Pierce or Mari Bergman
512-463-5770

AUSTIN, TX – As a result of a court order issued on Saturday, voters casting a ballot in the special runoff election for Texas House District 120 will have additional options for identifying themselves at the polls.

These provisions are temporary and apply only to this special runoff election.

If a voter does not have one of the seven forms of approved photo ID, a voter may vote provisionally and sign an affidavit attesting to the fact that the voter is the same person who personally appeared at the polling place, the voter is casting a ballot while voting in person, and the voter has a reasonable impediment which keeps the voter from obtaining an acceptable form of photo ID.  Along with the affidavit, voters may present either a valid voter registration certificate or current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows the name of the voter.

If a voter does not have one of those requested documents, the voter will need to provide their date of birth and the last four digits of their Social Security number as a part of the affidavit. Absent conclusive evidence of impersonation or an incomplete provisional ballot package, the provisional ballot shall be counted.

Only in-person voters without one of the seven forms of approved ID need to sign the affidavit in order to vote. The seven forms of approved photo ID are:

  • Texas driver license issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS)
  • Texas Election Identification Certificate issued by DPS
  • Texas personal identification card issued by DPS
  • Texas license to carry a handgun issued by DPS
  • United States military identification card containing the person’s photograph
  • United States citizenship certificate containing the person’s photograph
  • United States passport

With the exception of the U.S. citizenship certificate, the identification must be current or have expired no more than 60 days before being presented for voter qualification at the polling place.

Early voting in person for the HD 120 special runoff election begins on Monday, July 25, and ends on Friday, July 29. Election Day is August 2.

Previous to her resignation, HD 120 was represented by Ruth Jones McClendon. The district includes parts of Bexar County.

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